Monday, October 18, 2021
HomeSevere weatherBlizzardsWEATHER: Rain Early, Then Warming Up By Late Week - wpdh.com

WEATHER: Rain Early, Then Warming Up By Late Week – wpdh.com

The sudden cold snap the Hudson Valley experienced late last week appears to be long gone, as warmer weather returns this week. The chance of rain is expected to linger around the first couple of days into the week. Then, we’ll be looking at above average temperatures which will feel more like early September than October.

Highs Monday should stay in the 60s, though the humidity and chance for rain will persist throughout the day. Showers are forecasted off and on through the afternoon. Lows will be in the upper 50s overnight, with a continued chance for more rain. Tuesday might bring some breaks of sun, though it is expected to stay mostly cloudy. There is still a chance for a scattered shower through the day, as highs will be in the low to mid 60s. Clouds should start to clear by late Tuesday night, with lows in the upper 50s.

Warmer weather will return as the week progresses. Highs Wednesday and Thursday should be in the low 70s, with a mixture of sun and clouds. There could be a chance for scattered shower or two each day, though the chance for rain should not be that great. Lows will be in the upper 50s each night.

Friday will see highs in the mid 70s with partly cloudy skies. Lows will be in the mid 50s. Clouds and the chance for rain showers will once again return by the weekend, as highs will stay in the 60s both Saturday and Sunday. The chance for showers will be greater Sunday, according to extended forecasts. According to The Weather Channel, temperatures should remain in the 70s for a majority of the week ahead, so the above average weather could be sticking around for a while.

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