Author: Madeleine Cuff

Analysis of internal climate projections shows Exxon scientists knew the harm of burning fossil fuels, while firm’s executives played down the risk Environment 12 January 2023 By Madeleine Cuff ExxonMobil is one of the world’s largest oil and gas companiesJHVEPhoto/iStock/Getty Images Exxon scientists accurately predicted the pace and scale of climate change more than 40 years ago, according to a study that its authors say adds weight to claims the oil firm knew about and sought to downplay the risks posed by continued fossil fuel use. Scientists working for Exxon between 1977 and 2003 accurately forecasted the rate at which…

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Schemes that aim to reduce traffic through certain streets have been accused of increasing air pollution on roads at their borders, but a study in London has found that the opposite is true Environment 24 November 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A low traffic neighbourhood in LondonEleventh Hour Photography / Alamy Stock Photo Low traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs), which use giant planters, barriers and cameras to restrict vehicle access to residential streets, lead to a reduction in traffic volume and nitrogen dioxide pollution both inside their perimeters and on boundary roads, according to a study of three such schemes in London. The…

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Brazil’s incoming president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva vowed to reverse the environmentally damaging policies of his predecessor in a speech at the UN climate meeting Environment 16 November 2022 By Madeleine Cuff Brazil’s president-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was greeted with cheers at the COP27 climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, as he declared “Brazil is back” and ready to lead the world on tackling climate change. Fresh from a narrow election victory earlier this month, Lula vowed to reverse the destruction of the Amazon rainforest that has accelerated under the current president, Jair Bolsonaro. He promised the…

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A committee of MPs has urged the government to exploit the vast amount of underground heat beneath the UK, but realising that potential isn’t straightforward Environment | Analysis 20 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff Drilling at United Downs Deep Geothermal Project in Cornwall, UKGeothermal Engineering Ltd Never mind the gas crisis – beneath our feet lies enough free heat to keep the UK warm not just this winter, but every winter for decades to come. That is according to UK members of parliament on the Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) who wrote to the business secretary, Jacob Rees-Mogg, on 19 October…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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Brazil has cleared large parts of the Amazon rainforest for use as farmland, encouraging economic growth but causing environmental harm. Now researchers suggest that making intense use of already cleared land could avoid the need to fell any more trees Environment 10 October 2022 By Madeleine Cuff A soy plantation in the Amazon in Belterra, BrazilRicardo Beliel/Brazil Photos/LightRocket via Getty Images Encouraging more intensive farming in areas of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest that have already been felled could help preserve the rest of the rainforest, by boosting crop yields without serious environmental impacts, researchers have found. For decades Brazilian farmers…

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