Author: Mike Wolterbeek

Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

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Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

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Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

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Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

Read More

Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

Read More

Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

Read More

Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

Read More

Scientists in the College of Engineering are leading an effort to understand the potential for human exposure to toxic substances that may persist in the environment from hundreds of formerly used defense sites in Alaska. “We are going to look for exactly what’s left over there and see how these chemicals are transported through the environment in response to climate change,” Frank Yang, project lead and environmental engineering professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said. “When the sites are warming up, more toxicants can be released into the environment. We will find and quantify impacts on the…

Read More