Mining & Metals

Soil metals linked with cancer mortality — ScienceDaily

Spanish epidemiologists and geologists have found associations between esophageal cancer and soils where lead is abundant, lung cancer and terrains with increased copper content, brain tumor with areas rich in arsenic, and bladder cancer with high cadmium levels. These statistical links do not indicate that there is a cause-effect relationship between soil type and cancer, but they suggest that the ...

Read More »

Recycling experts hit milestone in quest for zero-waste phone — ScienceDaily

UBC researchers have perfected a process to efficiently separate fibreglass and resin — two of the most commonly discarded parts of a cellphone — bringing them closer to their goal of a zero-waste cellphone. It’s one of the first processes to use simple techniques like gravity separation to cleanly lift organic resins from inorganic fibreglass. “Discarded cellphones are a huge, ...

Read More »

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial sense — ScienceDaily

Electronic waste — including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones — is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it’s been unclear whether it’s reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology ...

Read More »

Scientist studies whether solar storms cause animal beachings — ScienceDaily

A long-standing mystery among marine biologists is why otherwise healthy whales, dolphins, and porpoises — collectively known as cetaceans — end up getting stranded along coastal areas worldwide. Could severe solar storms, which affect Earth’s magnetic fields, be confusing their internal compasses and causing them to lose their way? Although some have postulated this and other theories, no one has ...

Read More »

Svalbard’s electric power could come from hydrogen — ScienceDaily

The energy supply to Longyearbyen, midway between continental Norway and the North Pole, is a hot topic in the climate debate. Longyearbyen is the largest settlement and the administrative centre of Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. Today, Longyearbyen obtains its electric power and district heating from its coal power plant, the only one in Norway. This plant ...

Read More »

Three new uranium minerals from Utah — ScienceDaily

Leesite, leószilárdite and redcanyonite are three new uranyl minerals discovered growing on the walls of old uranium mines in southern Utah. An alumnus of Michigan Technological University found them. “Have you ever seen the Hills Have Eyes? It’s that kind of creepy, barren desert landscape,” says Travis Olds ’12, now a graduate student at Notre Dame studying uranyl mineral compounds. ...

Read More »

Long-term impacts of deep-sea mineral mining — ScienceDaily

A new international study has demonstrated that deep-sea nodule mining will cause long-lasting damage to deep-sea life. This study, led by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), was the first to review all the available information on the impacts of small-scale sea-floor disturbances simulating mining activity. It found clear impacts on marine ecosystems from deep-sea nodule mining activities, which ...

Read More »

Marine scientists focus on shelf areas — ScienceDaily

The demand for raw materials is rising continuously, forcing mining companies to use lower-grade ores and to explore at greater depths. This could lead to a decline in production in the coming decades. Many industrialized economies also depend on imports of metals for their high-tech industries. Some of these metals occur in ore deposits that are found only in a ...

Read More »

New metalloid oxide reducing bacteria found in Manitoba’s Nopiming gold mine tailings — ScienceDaily

A new study published in the Canadian Journal of Microbiology has identified new toxic metalloid-reducing bacteria in highly polluted abandoned gold mine tailings in Manitoba’s Nopiming Provincial Park. “These bacteria have the ability to convert toxic components that exist as a result of mining activities into less toxic forms and are prevalent in extreme environments,” says Dr. Vladimir Yurkov, Professor ...

Read More »