Biodiversity

Researchers define a new ocean-life zone, name it the Rariphotic

Smithsonian scientists have recently defined a new ocean-life zone, comprising of reef fishes, including numerous new species, that live well below shallow coral reefs. The new zone was named Rariphotic. The new zone was defined based on the unique fish fauna observed from a manned submersible on a southern Caribbean reef system in Curaçao, between 130 and 309 meters (about ...

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Global supply chains cause extinction of many species

Thirty percent of threatened species are at risk because of consumption in developed world according to research made by University of Sydney. The study mapped the world economy to trace the global trade of goods implicated in biodiversity loss such as coffee, cocoa, and lumber. Years of data collection and thousands of hours on a supercomputer to process, lead to these global supply chains ...

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Africa’s savannas are changing into forests

Recent changes in the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are forcing the African savannas to change into forests. Researchers believe that by the end of this century large swathes of land that was once savanna could have transformed into forest. The study hypothesized that fertilisation by atmospheric carbon dioxide is forcing the change. The switch will take place at a different ...

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Stinky red seaweed invades New England beaches in US

An awful odor of a foreign invasive red seaweed is smelling from Long Island Sound to the southern Gulf of Maine, US. A red seaweed originating from Japan is invading New England beaches. Scientists fear the seaweed could harm the coastal ecosystem by growing over native seaweed, starving it of light and nutrients and damaging a habitat and food source for many marine ...

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Tropical plankton invades Arctic waters

Scientists have identified tropical and subtropical species of marine protozoa living in the Arctic Ocean for the first time. It looks like they traveled thousands of miles on Atlantic currents and ended up above Norway with an unusual-but naturally cyclic-pulse of warm water. Researchers point that it is not a direct result of overall warming climate. However, arctic waters are warming ...

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Coffee Arabica could be extinct by the end of the century

Arabica coffee production is strongly (negative) influenced by accelerated climate change, and in most cases the outcome will be negative for the coffee industry.Wild Arabica coffee or Coffee Arabica could extinct due climate changes by the end of this century according to new study conducted by UK scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens in collaboration with scientists in Ethiopia (the ...

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New island emerged off the coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

An island ground composed of sandbanks emerged in North Sea, 24 km (15 miles) off the coast of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany’s far north. This is the area of a shallow body of water with tidal flats and wetlands. A discernible landmass composed of sandbanks grew gradually over the past few years in a stretch of coastline near marine national park Wattenmeer, mostly created by tidal actions.   Location of Bird ...

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A disturbance in the forest from Landsat perspective

This is a sequence of Landsat-based data in the Pacific Northwest. There is one data set for each year representing an aggregate of the approximate peak of the growing season (around August). The data was created using a sophisticated algorithm called LandTrendr. The visualization zooms into the Portland area showing different types of land such as agricultural, urban, and forests, ...

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Petrified giant ancient trees found in Thailand

In 2003, a small section of a large petrified log was found in a reserve forest at Ban Tak District, Tak Province, Thailand, by a villager. This lead to investigation in this area by officials of the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department and many such logs were discovered, leading to a name change of this forest to Petrified ...

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Don’t let the bed bugs bite!

In the quiet of the night a female Cimex lectularius crawls out of her hiding place, lured by the CO2 gas and the warmth that your body emits. When she reaches a patch of your exposed skin, she uses her small sharp beak to pierce the flesh and suck up to six times her weight of blood. She prefers the face, neck ...

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